Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

The Pine Mushroom Bonanza

Tricholoma Matsutake

Two weeks ago I reported that the mushroom fever had gripped the people living in the Arrow Laks area. The chanterelles started the bonanza. But when the first pine mushrooms popped up after the September rains, the focus shifted to the lucrative matsutake crop. Buyers were setting up shop in Nakusp and at Arrow Park. They grade the mushrooms on a 5-point quality scale. Number 1 mushrooms are buttons with the entire veil intact.  Today’s post is all about the variety which the Japanese love so much that they are willing to pay a small fortune for their unique smell and taste and perhaps for their aphrodisiacal qualities. I added the picture of a squirrel who also loves these fine specimens. Enjoy.

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35 comments

  1. Amy · October 16

    I’ve never heard of this type of mushroom. I guess my experiences with mushrooms are very limited—the white ones in the grocery store, portabello, and shitake. Looks like fun!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 16

      It is a great mystery to scientists, who have studied these mushrooms. They cannot be grown commercially and must grow under special conditions in our forests. Indeed, mushroom picking is a lot of fun and very healthy. Thank you, Amy!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Stella, oh, Stella · October 16

    They look nice!!!! I have never seen them here in Denmark though. You got a good harvest.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 16

      You will never find them in Denmark, Birgit. They need a special white clayish soil and thrive only in a mysterious symbiosis with trees in our forests. That makes them so special and pricey. Best wishes! Peter

      Liked by 1 person

      • Stella, oh, Stella · October 17

        Thanks for the information, Peter. How did the Japanese find out about them, I wonder? Or do/did they also occur in Japan?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Peter Klopp · October 17

        The Japanese as far as I know do not have these mushrooms, But they once occupied Korea, where most of the pine mushrooms grow.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Stella, oh, Stella · October 18

        Interesting! I bet they tried to grow them in Japan, but some things, like obviously this mushroom, are very particular …

        Liked by 1 person

  3. shoreacres · October 16

    I loved the addition of the squirrel to the collection of photos. It’s quite appropriate, too, since squirrels not only enjoy eating fresh mushrooms, they’ll also dry them and store them in ‘pantries’ for use during the winter. Squirrels don’t live by acorns and nuts alone!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. thecedarjournal · October 16

    Really cool stuff! I guess a bit of extra income, is that why Your wife is so happy?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 16

      Yes, a little extra income earned the fun way is always welcome when you are retired. Thank you!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Su Leslie · October 16

    Matsutake are unfamiliar to me too. But they look good! I love the little squirrel too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Anonymous · October 16

    We don’t have mushrooms in our area. The squirrels that inhabit our backyard have subsisted for years on the numerous loquats from our neighbor’s tree that hangs over our fence. Our local deer have enjoyed the abundant loquats, too. But this year the loquats didn’t come. I guess the tree that was planted around 45 years ago has gotten old. So the squirrels have returned to acorns. The deer are not so lucky. They have eaten all our flowers and now there is no more food for them.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Ulli · October 16

    Ganz tolle Bilder, lieber Peter, da kommt Freude in meine Stube, vom ersten bis zum letzten Bild. Danke dafür und herzliche Grüße
    Ulli

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 16

      Ja, es ist wirklich schön, wenn man gute Bilder und Kommentare aus aller Welt sehen und lesen kann. Du hast auch immer etwa Interessantes auf deinem Blog zu bieten. Viele liebe Grüße aus dem fernen Kanada, liebe Ulli!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. tanjabrittonwriter · October 16

    What a wonderful harvest. I hope you will enjoy an exquisite mushroom dinner! 🍄

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 16

      Thank you, Tanja, for kind comment! I checked out your blog and took an instant liking to your photos and to what you have to say about nature.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I am surprised that you can harvest Matsutake mushrooms, that fantastic, I buy those in Health food Stores here. Cute squirrel portrait.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. kopfundgestalt · October 17

    Dancing in the light 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. arv! · October 17

    The region we live in doesn’t have indigenous mushrooms so it’s not popular here. The ones we get are grown in created conditions. Not much choice, to really!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Ann Coleman · October 17

    Wow! You are very successful at “mushrooming,” as my in-laws always called it. And I loved the photo of the squirrel who also appreciates a good mushroom….

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 17

      The sqirrels’ cries of protest are all over the forest, where the mushroom pickers are taking their favourite dessert.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Govardhan · October 18

    Reblogged this on Vijayagiri views.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Steve Schwartzman · October 18

    Like the other commenters, I wasn’t aware of these mushrooms and the special conditions in which they grow. Good for you.

    In rare seasons I’ve found morel mushrooms in Austin and have harvested good quantities; in most years I see none at all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · October 19

      From the little I know from others about morels I can tell you that they thrive and pop in the spring after people have burned the grass.

      Like

  15. PlantsandBeyond · October 21

    oh my, it’s my dream since childhood to mushroom pick, but here in the US I have no idea which ones are safe to consume. Are these edible? Just amazing, as your photography, Peter makes all things come to life.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Sartenada · October 22

    Hello Peter.

    What a great post you made. Tricholoma Matsutakes are not found in my country, I checked it!

    Have a great day!

    Liked by 1 person

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