Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Bud Development Study Ends With Today’s Post

After weeks of slow budding of the four bushes under investigation, I can report a veritable explosion in the growth development. Nature has finally woken up and although a whole month late Spring has sprung. The photos of the final week showed more growth than the combined development of the previous five. The magnolia bush is clearly the winner showing off its magnificent splendour. The lilac came in second. I expect the rose bush to burst into full bloom in another two weeks, and poor little azalea sitting in a shaded and cool area of our yard will be last. I found this study quite interesting and so did you following me. My plan is to repeat the study with four other flowering shrubs in 2021.

 

Rose                                          Lilac                                Magnolia                                    Azalia

Bonus Photo

“Should we risk going into Peter’s garden?

IMG_0977Edited

 

 

27 comments

  1. Des · 18 Days Ago

    Peter, your bud development study provides an interesting contrast to similar plants further south. Most of our plants have open leaves now, with only a few slow ones playing catch-up. Hope your cold-weather vegetables are still hanging in there!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · 17 Days Ago

      Yes, our lettuce in our raised garden beds are doing very well and will be ready to be harvested in another week or too.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Robert Parker · 18 Days Ago

    I know it’s a big genus, with lots of subsections, but in my mind, I always associate “magnolia” with the South, so it seems strange that it’s the first to blossom. The magnolias here in NY are opening up too. Peter, this has been a very interesting time-lapse project! I like your imagined duck conversation, too. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Pit · 18 Days Ago

    “but in my mind, I always associate “magnolia” with the South, so it seems strange that it’s the first to blossom.” – Same here. I didn’t know they’re doing that great so far north.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 17 Days Ago

      These are hardy varieties, which are doing quite well in our area.

      Like

      • Pit · 17 Days Ago

        My wife keeps thinking of having some in our garden. We’ve seen some quite gorgeous ones around here.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. PlantsandBeyond · 18 Days Ago

    Yes, risk it! lol. We would love to see Peter’s garden

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Stella, oh, Stella · 18 Days Ago

    Wow kann ich da nur sagen, das ist ja wirklich explosiv!

    Der Flieder blüht bei uns noch nicht richtig.
    Right, English, but my Rhodos are showing a bit more life. My Japanese azaleas are very reluctant this year, no flowers yet.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · 17 Days Ago

      You seem to have a similar weather pattern, which is slowing down the blossoming of many flowers and plants.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Stella, oh, Stella · 17 Days Ago

        Yes, it was the same last year: a comparatively warm winter, and then a cold spring. Maybe this is the new normal.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. kopfundgestalt · 18 Days Ago

    Klar sollten sie deinen GHarten entern! Haben sie’s gemacht? 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pure Glory · 18 Days Ago

    Peter, thanks for sharing the final explosion of new life. In Alaska we always have a rapid opening of the fresh leaves. Happy gardening!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Amy · 17 Days Ago

    I’ve loved following this. Why stop? Certainly not all of them are in full bloom. I say keep going until the rose blossoms!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · 17 Days Ago

      I am glad you enjoyed the development study of the budding process, Amy. The magnolia has already lost its petals and the rose bush still has a long way to go till it is in full bloom. Thank you for your interest, Amy!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Su Leslie · 17 Days Ago

    I love this time-lapse series Peter; so interesting to see familiar plants in an unfamiliar environment.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Hallo Peter, I really enjoy your Bud Development studies, it definitely shows the speed of growth of your wonderful plants, you are doing an amazing job to raise them to their best. Oh, Flieder, wie ich diesen liebe.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 17 Days Ago

      One more week and the lilac will be in full bloom here in our yard. Thank you for the compliment, Cornelia!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. shoreacres · 17 Days Ago

    I so enjoyed this series, Peter. Perhaps we can see the lilac or rose when it blooms. I found some buds-to-bloom action myself in east Texas; you might enjoy seeing the process in an orchid.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 16 Days Ago

      Once any of the other shrubs begin to bloom, I will publish their images one at a time. Great suggestion!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Steve Schwartzman · 15 Days Ago

    A happy end to this year’s study. Perhaps next time you can include a species that’s native up there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 15 Days Ago

      That is a good suggestion. I will check with you beforehand to see if the plant in question is truly a native plant.

      Like

  13. Steve Schwartzman · 14 Days Ago

    I probably wouldn’t know off the top of my head, having been in your general area only once, but we can find out, thanks to the Internet.

    Liked by 1 person

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