Meta Emma Klopp – Friedrich and Emma’s Fourteenth Child – Part 6

Meta is Getting Married

The Gestapo Mülbert case contains for the perhaps forgetful descendants all the ingredients, which empower a dictatorship to oppress with the aid of dug-up trivialities its subjects and if found to be correct, to set into motion their elimination. The bitter cup filled by his own wife went by Vincenz only because of his political insignificance, which she had convincingly put on the table.

Nothing stood in the way to Meta Klopp to get married. Vincenz, having been found blameless, experienced in Meta understanding and compassion. In the eyes of Anna von Waldenfels, he represented after initial speechlessness certainly an acceptable person. She could not have imagined in her wildest dreams her little sister Meta as Frau Professor. The fact that the nerves of this – for Klopp standards and social status – highly educated humanist were presently stretched to their breaking point, added wings to Meta’s tender loving care. Her love enabled her to easily overlook his somewhat scurrilous outer appearance. Also the other religious (Catholic) denomination and the sudden onslaught of a large number of stepchildren were manageable burdens to bear. On the other hand, the much pampered and youngest Klopp girl was looking forward to a social climb of unimaginable proportions. They did not equal, to be sure, to Anna’s spectacular journey into the Bavarian nobility, but nevertheless brought her the respectable title of a ‘professor’s wife’.

Berlin,_Mitte,_Bebelplatz,_Hedwigskathedrale_02

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

On October 24, 1935 the Catholic wedding for the new couple Mülbert took place at the Saint Hedwig Cathedral in Berlin. Meta had converted to the Catholic faith out of love for her husband. The news reached the Wolmirstedt-Zieglitz branches of the Klopp family. They were in no way involved, but found fresh food for gossip and wallowed in their pseudo indignation.

Meta treated like a true mother all her stepchildren with tender loving care. She could not have children of her own. Until 1940 she lived with her husband in Mannheim. During his last year of service he seemed to have suffered from constant health problems. On April 1, 1942, the couple rented an apartment in Freiburg, Breisgau. On December 11, 1940 Vincenz Mülbert was granted early retirement. They lost their new residence in the heavily bombed city in World War II.

10 comments

  1. Stella, oh, Stella · 16 Days Ago

    Looks like Vincenz and his children were lucky to get Meta into their lives.

    The wars have brought so much misery for the entire world … I am extremely grateful that I was allowed to live my life outside of war zones (so far) … which is not a given.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pastor Cathy · 16 Days Ago

    Meta Emma Klopp – Friedrich and Emma’s Fourteenth Child – Part 6
    by Peter Klopp

    Like

  3. Pastor Cathy · 16 Days Ago

    cathynative77@gmail.com Pastor Cathy Native

    On Thu, May 14, 2020 at 9:04 AM The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Family Project wrote:

    > Peter Klopp posted: “Meta is Getting Married The Gestapo Mülbert case > contains for the perhaps forgetful descendants all the ingredients, which > empower a dictatorship to oppress with the aid of dug-up trivialities its > subjects and if found to be correct, to set into motion th” >

    Like

  4. Amy · 16 Days Ago

    I am glad that Meta had some happiness in her life, even if at the end she lost her home in World War II. (Is this your translation of someone’s German writing?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 16 Days Ago

      The book has been written by my distant cousin Eberhard Klopp. He has been researching our ancestors, visited family members and travelled far and wide sometimes with my late brother Karl Klopp to gather the extremely detailed information. I consider it my obligation to our family branch in Canada, our five sons and grandchildren to have this information available in English.

      By the way, I read the sample edition of the Seventh Cross and liked it so much that I downloaded from Amazon the entire book. It is definitely worth reading. Thanks for bringing this book to my attention, Amy!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Amy · 16 Days Ago

        I am reading it now myself. Not the most uplifting book to read right now, but… Are you reading it in German or English?

        And you know that I appreciate the need to preserve family history! I just knew it didn’t read like your English!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Peter Klopp · 16 Days Ago

        I read it in English. I like the author’s style that is succinct and stands out with the use of short sentences, which is quite different from German literature.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Amy · 16 Days Ago

        It would be interesting to see how it compares to the original German version. I wonder how much of that style comes from the translator, not Nelli/Anna herself.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. It is a fascinating story. Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

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