Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Of Cattails, Tree Stumps, and Canada Geese

The week before the Easter weekend was chilly but sunny. Early in the morning we traveled 10 km south of Fauquier, drove past a pond that was still frozen. We briefly stopped to capture a few of the cattails which after a long winter were getting ready to spread their fluffy seed heads. When we arrived at the lake, a number of beautifully sculpted tree stumps attracted our attention. When the lake level is low, they make their appearance. More than fifty years ago all trees at the lakeshore had been cut down to prepare for the building of the Keenleyside Dam near Castlegar. You may also like the arrival of more Canada geese.

23 comments

  1. Robert Parker · 8 Days Ago

    Nice shots, especially the first one, I like that glowing fluff on the cattail in the foreground.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 8 Days Ago

      I felt when I published those photos that there would be at least one follower who would like the fluffy cattail. Thank you for the compliment, Robert!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Dina · 8 Days Ago

    What a gorgeous, scenic location, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 8 Days Ago

      Indeed, it is a very scenic location. But with all the restrictions we cannot travel. My wife and I miss the annual trip to the West Coast and the Pacific Ocean.

      Like

  3. Amy · 8 Days Ago

    It’s amazing that those trunks are still there after 50 years.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Stella, oh, Stella · 8 Days Ago

    I am with Amy, especially when they are under water from time to time … beautiful pictures, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful images! I especially like the ones with the bleached tree trunks in the foreground. What a gorgeous area!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 8 Days Ago

      The tree trunk have been mostly under water. It’s truly amazing that they lasted that many years.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Very striking images, Peter, of course the tree trunks.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. floresphotographic · 7 Days Ago

    In Wales, there is an ancient, sunken forest of tree stumps that reveals itself on rare occasions after storms. Scientists think it existed 6000 years ago and began to die out 4500 years ago when water levels rose.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 7 Days Ago

      There is evidence that there have been world-wide catastrophies in historical times.

      Like

  8. Labby · 7 Days Ago

    Hallo Peter, sehr schöne Fotos. Die Gänse am Himmel, sind das Canada Gänse? LG Wolfgang

    Liked by 1 person

  9. shoreacres · 7 Days Ago

    I especially like the third photo. I see a person curled up on that rocky beach, with his head resting inside the stump. It looks as though he’s reaching out with his hand to steady himself, and keep himself from rolling into the lake!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. kopfundgestalt · 6 Days Ago

    Der Klotz ist ja so etwas wie ein Markenzeichen. Immerhin erfreut er noch viele Besucher jahrelang.
    Liebe Grüße Gerhard

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · 5 Days Ago

      ja aber ein trauriges Merkmal von einer Zeit, als viele Farmer ihr Land verloren haben.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. rabirius · 5 Days Ago

    I’m always impressed by your Arrow Lakes pictures. I will definitely visit them one day to see the amazing landscape for myself.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Steve Gingold · 3 Days Ago

    I always enjoy old driftwood and stumps along shorelines. The reservoir I visit, Quabbin, was originally four towns that were disenfranchised with all homes removed or torn down, and when it was created a lot of trees were excavated and many of the stumps still sit by water’s edge. I posted images of one here.

    I don’t know if I would have seen it on my own, but having read Linda’s comment I definitely see the guy with his head hidden in the stimp.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Steve Schwartzman · 2 Days Ago

    This is similar to some places in central Texas where you can still see the stumps of large bald cypress trees that got cut down in preparation for building six dams to control the Colorado River in the 1930s. Some or even much of the cutting down seems to have been an unnecessary precaution. That may have been the same in your case, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · 10 Hours Ago

      The saddest part of all was that people lost their valuable agricultural land as a consequence of the flooding.

      Like

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