The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Family Project

Reflections on Life, Family and Community

Phenology: Nature Tells You…

2

The message of this reblogged post is loud and clear: As a successful gardener, for planting do not go by the calendar, but read the signposts of Mother Nature.

Denney Home Place

As gardeners in the colder climates, we are waiting to finally sow and plant things, and every year, there is this question of when to get what into the ground.  Instead of looking at calendars and weather forecasts, though, all you need to do is look at your yard for cues because nature tells you when the time is right.  The study of these signs is called Phenology, and it is really quite helpful for every gardener.  Below, you find two example lists, one sorted according to cues, the other according to vegetables, for your consideration.  While cues are different in every region, the following examples list plant cues that are quite common from sea to shining sea.  Happy gardening!

Cues

  • Blooming crocus are your cue to plant radishes, parsnips, and spinach.
  • When the forsythia is in bloom, it is safe to plant peas, onion sets, and lettuce.

View original post 256 more words

The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Story – ChapterXLI

10

Chapter 41

One more Painful Twist

 

IMG_3558Rose

Our human compassion binds us the one to the other – not in pity or patronizingly, but as human beings who have learnt how to turn our common suffering into hope for the future.

Nelson Mandela

Biene’s Father Gets a Stroke

March 17th, 1966 Velbert

My dear Peter,

Today in anticipation of spring the sun was shining its warm rays into our office and distracted me from my work. Herr Richter, a very understanding and capable department head remarked that I was in my thoughts already in Canada. But as brightly the sun may be shining and as much I long to be happy and light-hearted, it does not look as cheerful inside me. My father is very sick. He had suffered a stroke and must get rest for a very long time. I am sure that the excitement about me contributed to his illness, but the main cause was clearly his unhealthy life style. Dear Peter, you can imagine how things are now with me. Now that I can come to you, I cannot stand it here at home anymore. Also the barely concealed accusations that I am responsible for my father’s illness are tormenting me. I had been so happy after my trip to Cologne. Now I feel the full force of despair all over again. After an encouraging and conciliatory talk with my mother I had immediately booked my flight with the travel agency for April 6 to be with you already for Easter. Everything appeared to be so promising and now …  If my father quickly recovers, I will not postpone my flight; for I believe that the tension caused by my planned departure is harming him more than the certainty that I will be going away soon. I believe that it will be a relief for all of us, as hard as it sounds.

You are right, Peter. In England I was much stronger and also much happier. I could concentrate on myself and attempt to be myself, whereas here I am being torn apart by people, who love me, but wish to decide over my life according to their own ideas of happiness. Nobody can imagine that I wish for myself a totally different life and everybody tries to keep me away from my impending disaster. But they have no inkling that this way they make me and themselves unhappy. I know that it is right to come to you, even though many people think it is cruel.

I am looking forward to seeing you and spending the evenings with you in the tiny apartment. We will certainly then forget all the things which have burdened our hearts. And I hope that in your dreams you will no longer have to sleep with other girls.  For me as well temptations have been a constant threat. In England I had my freedom and your love in my heart. That gave me so much strength that I could easily resist the temptations. Even in my dreams I wasn’t searching for a more beautiful reality. Everybody liked me and also everybody knew that I love you. Here at home unfortunately everything is different. I cannot bear it any longer that I must hurt them so much. And yet I love you and I have made my decision. Sometimes I am in a state that I want to numb my senses. But have no fear. I will endure the remaining time I am here.

Now I am almost finished with my letter and have not yet thanked you for your long letter, which gave me a much needed lift. I am happy to hear that you have so much success with your studies. I will make certain that I will not be a distraction to your final exams when I am with you. Now, dear Peter, let us hope that I may soon come to you.

Be now sweetly embraced and kissed

Your Biene

P.S. By the way my inner calendar is very exact. Perhaps it is not good at all to worry so much about it.

IMG_2989Violet

Paving the Way towards a Brighter Future

Peter’s Last Letter before Biene’s Arrival in Canada

March 25th , Calgary

My dear Biene,

I remember very well the time when I wrote you the first long letter. Just like three years ago I am sitting in the warm spring sun and hope that it will bring some warmth into my lines.

Your birthday letter has reopened the locked chambers of my heart with power and might, and a flood of new ideas is pouring out about our near future, our little apartment, our weekends in the city or at the lakes in the mountains. With so much joyful tension and anticipation I can barely concentrate on my studies and I am longing for a break from my intensive work.

Only at night time I am still being plagued by ‘nightmares’, which constantly warn me against the wedding soon to take place. They whisper threateningly that we both don’t have the assurance of the heart to throw ourselves into such an adventure. But in the light of a new day I always return to my confidence and trust. I have been searching deep within me and often discovered that the very weaknesses I had attacked most fiercely in you lie also hidden in me. You were in deep trouble, almost in a state of desperation. There weaknesses emerged in a way that greatly disappointed me. But after some time through self-discovery I was able to understand them. I wished you wouldn’t worry about this my disappointment any more. In the atmosphere, where nobody dictates what our happiness should look like, let us work on the healing of soul, spirit and mind and let us try to overcome our weaknesses.

I am little ashamed that you are a bit afraid of me. Perhaps I have sometimes given you cause for such fear through my seemingly cold behaviour. Perhaps you even believed that your father’s illness could provide the answer to my last urgent question. Now that I did not receive any reply,  I had to assume of course that you are sticking to your original plans. In the meantime your parents will have received my letter, in which in very kind words I have adopted your and your mother’s position and reassured your parents that you would not be in any kind of danger. I hope my letter will contribute to alleviate their fears. I also wrote that I was sorry if they felt insulted by my letter last Christmas. Hopefully you will understand that I could not apologize for what I had written. The strength to overcome my reluctance to write and to fulfill all your wishes came from the returning trust that from now on everything between us will develop normally and we two will forget the ‘sick’ period of the last three months. Should we not learn to trust each other, then spiritually speaking we will have built our relationship on sand and I will have no more hope. I am looking forward to make a little paradise out of our apartment. We will achieve this with love, imagination, and our skilful hands.

Thanks for the many kisses. It’s too bad that I was only allowed to imagine them and did not receive them right away.

Please write when the plane arrives in Calgary, so I can pick you up.

Greetings in love

Your  Peter

34732386071_6713da4df3_o (1)

Biene’s Last Letters from Germany

March 26th, Velbert

My dear Peter,

Finally after a long time I have a quiet evening, which I want to devote to you right away. Normally there is always somebody here for a visit, even though I am not always in a sociable frame of mind and would prefer to be alone with my thoughts. Today it snowed so hard and the streets were so slippery that my friend Ulrike, who had come in spite of it all, immediately drove home again.

Now I sit at my desk, on which I had written so many letters. A little oil lamp, which a friend had given to me for my birthday, is spreading a soft light that creates a dreamy atmosphere. And so it also happens that I am playing my opera records. But ‘Don Giovanni’ will come last, when I am already in bed and have switched off the light. You must feel for sure, what I am thinking. Indeed it would be wonderful, if you were with me now. God willing it will not be long until I can come to you. Thank God, my father is on the road of recovery. We all are breathing a sigh of relief.

In the next couple of days I will finally book a flight. Yesterday my passport with all its pertinent papers stamped and cleared ready for the flight came back from Cologne. I am getting more and more excited. Hopefully at least you will stay calm before the exams.

I have to work for another five days. During the last month I have become so accustomed to my work that I thoroughly enjoyed it. This was especially due to the very pleasant department, in which I had been placed. I would really love to work in Calgary at an office of a large company, if that will be possible. Do you think, we will find something suitable?

My dear Peter, how can I possibly control my excitement, until I am with you? I feel it more and more. Dear Peter, I must not carry on thinking of all these things. Otherwise my fantasy will run wild and I will get sick with excitement, Hopefully I can soon pass the exact date of my arrival on to you.

My dear Peter, try also to remain as calm as possible. But I believe, even if I had to travel to the Shah of Persia, I would not be as excited as now at the thought of coming to you.

For now be lovingly embraced by your Biene

March 29th, Velbert

My dear Peter,

Very quickly the most important information! I just returned from the travel agent. The flight is booked and paid for. Next week on Wednesday, April 6th I take off at Düsseldorf at 13 hours and will arrive in Calgary at 22 hours local time.

I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your kind words with the good news in your last letter. I also thank you for writing to my parents. I am so happy about it. Your letter was well received by them. My father is getting better. I just don’t know how to manage to visit your mother in the remaining days. Unfortunately, my parents had also in this regard thrown obstacles in my way …

Dear Peter, although I did not do everything right in your eyes, I ask you for understanding. Unfortunately, it is true that letters can only reflect a fraction of the life and character of a person. Now I have to close and say goodbye.

Pray that all will be well.

Your Biene

Albert Schweitzer – Seminar #22

1

Die Geschichte von den Holzfällern

AS01

Ihr wisst ja schon, dass im Urwaldkrankenhaus von Albert Schweitzer viele kleine Häuser und Baracken standen. In ihnen lagen die Kranken auf ihren Betten oder es befanden sich in ihnen Räume, in denen der Doktor und andere Ärzte operierten, Räume, in denen Frauen die Wäsche wuschen, Kleidung nähten oder die Medikamente aufbewahrt wurden.

Alle diese Häuser waren früher aus Holz gebaut. Ziegelsteine und Zement gab es am Anfang noch nicht in Lambarene. Deshalb brauchten Albert Schweitzer und seine Helfer viele Balken und Bretter. Woher sollten sie diese aber nehmen? Es gab doch dort keinen Baumarkt, in dem man alles kaufen konnte! Doch es wuchsen ja im Urwald viele dicke und hohe Bäume. Sie waren dicker und größer als die Türme unserer alten Stadtmauer. Aber wie sollte man nur diese „Riesen” fällen und transportieren? Viele eingeborene Männer hatten Angst vor dieser Arbeit. Sie war nicht nur schwer, sondern auch sehr gefährlich. Wie leicht konnte man durch einen umstürzenden Baum verletzt oder gar erschlagen werden! Die Afrikaner hatten so etwas ja oft genug erlebt, wenn die Tropenstürme tobten!

Doch der Urwalddoktor wusste Rat. Er hatte ja als kleiner Junge oft genug den Bauern. Handwerkern und Forstleuten bei ihrer Arbeit zugesehen und sich alles gut gemerkt. So suchte er sich starke afrikanische Männer mit dicken Muskeln. „Wollt ihr mir helfen, Bäume zu fällen?“, fragte er sie. „Warum sollen wir denn Bäume fällen? Sie sind doch viel zu groß für uns!“, antworteten die Männer. Geduldig erklärte ihnen Albert Schweitzer, dass das Hospital neue Häuser braucht, weil es so viele Kranke gibt. Für die Häuser braucht man aber Bretter und Balken und sie gewinnt man eben aus Baumstämmen. Dazu muss man sie aber erst fällen und zersägen. Das verstanden die Männer und riefen: „Wir helfen ihnen Bretter machen, Doktor!“ Sie freuten sich auf diese Arbeit, als wäre es ein Spiel. Sie lachten und tanzten. Nur der Doktor blieb ernst, denn er wusste, wie schwer es für sie alle werden würde.

Zuerst kauften sie vom Händler in der Stadt große Holzsägen und schwere Äxte. Dann gingen sie tief in den Urwald. Obwohl die Sonne schien, war es unter dem dichten Laub am Boden ziemlich dunkel. Sie mussten auch deshalb sehr behutsam gehen, weil sie nicht auf eine Schlange treten durften. In den Baumkronen sprangen die Affen von Ast zu Ast. Einige Frechdaxe bewarfen die Männer mit Nüssen und kleinen Holzstücken als wollten sie ihnen sagen: „Das ist unser Urwald!“

Endlich fanden die Männer einen geeigneten Baum. Der war so dick, dass ihn selbst zehn erwachsene Menschen nicht umfassen konnten. Und das Holz war fast so hart wie Stein. Mühsam begannen die Männer zu sägen. Die Hitze war unerträglich. Es wehte kein Lüftchen, das etwas Erfrischung bringen könnte. Der schweiß rann ihnen in dicken Tropfen von der Stirn. Die Männer mussten sich bei ihrer Arbeit abwechseln. Während die einen arbeiteten, ruhten sich die anderen aus. Dabei summte sie leise Lieder ihres Stammes vor sich hin. Und sie alle hatten natürlich großen Durst. Aber es gab kein Wasser. So schlugen sie mit ihren großen Messern dicke Schlingpflanzen ab, die Wasserlianen heißen. In ihrem Inneren enthalten sie Wasser. Das tranken die Männer dann Schluck für Schluck. Viele Tage dauerte es, bis sie endlich den Baum fällen konnten.

Endlich neigte sich der Baum zur Seite. Doch er fiel nicht ganz um. In seiner Krone wuchsen Schlingpflanzen, die ihn festhielten. Also mussten erst einmal zwei gute und mutige Kletterer den Baum hinauf steigen und die Schlingpflanzen zerschneiden. Das war sehr gefährlich, denn die Männer konnten nur mir der einen Hand die Schlingpflanzen abhacken und mussten sich mit der anderen Hand an einem Ast festhalten. Schließlich fiel der Baum doch um. Albert Schweitzer hatte alles wohl bedacht und den Männern gesagt, was sie tun sollten. Sie hatten ja auch keine Erfahrung. Nach getaner Arbeit lobte er sie und sagte: „Eure kranken Brüder und Schwestern werden es euch danken, wenn sie in den neuen Häusern wohnen werden! Ihr habt ein gutes Herz gezeigt. In euren Herzen ist Liebe und wo die Liebe ist. da ist auch Gott!“ Da lachten sie und zeigten ihre schönen weißen Zähne. Einige begannen sogar zu tanzen vor Freude. Manche weiße Menschen meinen, die Schwarzen wären faul. Das stimmt aber nicht. Albert Schweitzer hat ihnen erklärt, dass die Afrikaner nicht faul sind, sondern als freie Menschen leben und es nur nicht so kennen wie wir, die wir nach der Uhr leben und arbeiten.

Noch viele, viele Tage hatten sie aber an dem großen Baumstamm zu schaffen. Er musste nämlich in Stücke zersägt werden. Denn es gab ja keine Bulldozer, welche die Stämme transportieren konnten. Die Männer mussten sich dicke Knüppel abschneiden und mit ihnen Meter für Meter die Stücke des Baumstammes aus dem Urwald an den großen Fluss rollen. Oft standen sie bis zum Bauch im Sumpf oder schnitten sich die Fußsohlen an scharfen Wurzeln oder Steinen auf. Dann mussten sie selbst ins Hospital, damit die Krankenschwestern sie verbinden konnten.

Schließlich hatten sie alle Stämme an das Ufer des Ogowe gerollt. Nun begann aber eine ganz andere Arbeit. Der Doktor sagte zu ihnen: „Wir müssen ein Floß bauen!“ „Was ist das, ein Floß?“, fragten die Männer. „Ein Floß sind zusammen gebundene Baumstämme, die auf dem Fluss schwimmen können“, antwortete er. „Wir schneiden uns Schlingpflanzen ab und benutzen sie als Seile. Damit binden wir die Stämme zusammen. Wenn sie alle fest verbunden sind, haben wir ein Floß!“

Inzwischen waren viele Menschen aus dem Hospitaldorf ans Ufer gekommen, um zu sehen, wie ein solches Floß entstand. Die Männer standen bis zur Brust im Wasser, um die Stämme zu verbinden. Dabei mussten sie auch aufpassen, dass keine Krokodile kamen und sie bissen. Als das Floß endlich fertig war, sprangen alle in die Luft vor Freude, tanzten und sangen fröhliche Lieder.

Am nächsten Tag konnten nun endlich die Männer mit ihrem Floß auf dem Strom abwärts zu einem Sägewerk schwimmen. Dort wurden die dicken Stämme in Bretter und Balken zersägt. Schließlich kamen sie dann wieder mit einem Motorschiff zurück zum Hospital. Dort konnte man jetzt mit dem Bau der Häuser und Baracken beginnen.

Wie froh war der Doktor, als das Werk vollbracht war. Todmüde setzte er sich am Abend an sein Klavier und spielte Musik von Johann Sebastian Bach. Das war für ihn Erholung. Damit wollte er aber auch dafür danken, dass er die Kraft hatte, anderen Menschen zu helfen.

family221

Wir merken uns:

Es ist schön, wenn einem geholfen wird. Aber es ist noch schöner, wenn man anderen helfen kann. Auch wenn eine Aufgabe noch so schwer ist, soll man nicht verzagen.

Happy Easter to all my Blogging Friends

23

22989035365_425dbae40b_z (1)

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lake

30

Wednesday’s Photos

Awakening of Nature in and around Fauquier

Oregon grapes blooming high above the lake

Oregon Grapes blooming high above the Lake

Catkins ready to pollinate the tiny red flowers of a hazelnut tree

Catkins ready to Pollinate the tiny Red Flowers of the Hazelnut Tree

Tiny, yet so beautiful - thousands of these violets blooming on our yard

Tiny, yet so beautiful – Thousands of these Violets blooming in our Yard

Birds announcing the arrival of spring on every tree

Birds cheerfully announcing the Arrival of Spring on Every Tree

Crocuses receiving their first spring guest in their floral abode

A Crocus receiving its first Spring Guest in its Floral Abode

The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Story – Chapter XL

11

5127_fdfc457d_cityrossaitken

A Young Man’s Anxiety about the Future

“Optimism is a strategy for making a better future. Because unless you believe that the future can be better, you are unlikely to step up and take responsibility for making it so.”

-Noam Chomsky

Loving the Real Person, not the Fantasy Hero

March 11th, Calgary

My dear Biene,

You know me as a very cautious person, who often perceives the future as more ominous than it is. Yet now I can state with a clear conscience that I will certainly pass all my final exams in April. My academic achievements are already way above the average. In Math I collected so many percentage points that I wouldn’t need to take the final in order to pass the course. The last exam day is April 29th. Now if we were really reasonable, it would be best if you came in May, when all my studies will be over. But my desire is to see you again much sooner. Also I think it to be in our favour if you keep your fingers crossed right here close to me. It will certainly help.

Quite frankly I am getting quite a bit scared. I am really looking forward to your coming, but the burden of new responsibilities gives cause to think about many things. You must understand, Biene, why I had asked so strongly for preparedness for our great adventure. The inner bond between us must rest on solid ground. Biene, it is not the money that bothers me, but the fact as I had said before that you want to go away again, even if only for a short time. I don’t know, Biene. Call it selfishness, if you wish, but I feel it is not right what you have in mind out of love for your mother. Yet, I don’t want to dwell on it any more. I believe that your trip to the Canadian Embassy in Cologne will shed considerable light on this matter. In suspense I am awaiting your answer.

Dear Biene, I believe you that you are wearing my ring. Lately I really had to restrain myself. Often frightening thoughts are surfacing and I don’t know why. So the thought that had been tormenting me in my subconscious suddenly had slipped out. I felt a certain kind of relief afterwards, until I realized that I felt better at your expense and a few days later felt very sorry about this question.

The hero and angel from England will not appear at the Calgary Airport. But I consider myself lucky that the illusion of a superwoman has been taken away from me! Do you not also believe that it is the greatest mistake a man can commit in his ecstasy to no longer see his partner as a human being? I think that life taught me a very valuable lesson in this regard. Dear Biene, take also great care not to see more in me than reality will permit.

princess-island-park (1)ED

Peter makes a Confession

Believe me, dear Biene, I am a paragon of faithfulness in my outer conduct towards my female fellow students. However, do external actions describe the entire human being? Was I permitted to absorb with burning desire the images of womanly shapes, which enticingly passed by before me in the great lecture hall of the university?  Was it OK to sleep in my dreams with other girls than you alone? Biene, when I thoroughly examine myself and notice in the depth of my inner being the flickering of thousands of secret desires, I must confess that I have betrayed you innumerable times. To admit this dark side to oneself takes a long time. Some, alas too many deny its existence. I don’t know what kind of impression I am making on you now. I don’t know whether you are relieved to hear it or whether you will pass a moral judgment over a completely amoral matter. I said yes to myself and henceforth I am getting along with myself much better. I believe that this attitude is also the precondition to get along with others.

Recently I dreamed about you in my sleep for the first time. I wonder why I did not do this before. After all you and our future have constantly been on my mind with anxious thoughts so much so that I lay awake often for hours after my evening studies. The dream was not something of the past. No, one Saturday morning you entered my room. I threw all my books into a corner. In a long walk we passed wonderful hours ambling through the Calgary Zoo. Finally I woke up caused by the disappointment that you had suddenly disappeared.

calgarypeacebridge

Tackling a Delicate Problem

The Idealist is Voicing his Opinion

Dear Biene, regarding children you found a seemingly good solution by suggesting that we should go and see a doctor together. I would like to broach this hot topic right away. The doctor will help you in no other way than to recommend to you to swallow that notorious pill. Allow me to tell you, dear Biene, why I harbour such a profound resentment against any such plan. Please do not consider me old-fashioned, when I launch an attack against this form of birth control, even though it is being hailed as a great medical success story.

I do not wish to talk about the obvious health related consequences at this time, but more importantly rather discuss the hidden psychological effects on our life together. In my view the interplay between tension and relaxation determines our creativity. Ideas are sparked by the inner tension and within the subsequent state of relaxation rests true happiness. If now by using the pill our relationship deteriorates into something rather common or even vulgar, where inner tension never surfaces and, if it does, is immediately dissolved, then – so it appears to me – our life will taste no better than lukewarm water. Therefore, Biene, let us be ‘old-fashioned’. Watch your internal calendar and if your biological clock is halfway accurate, we will find a useful solution. I strongly believe it would be far better for us to become parents than to lead such a distastefully ordinary life.

As to my studies you should know that I have practically regained the lost  years of my German army time by having started my studies here in Canada. Since I am taking senior courses in German literature, I am ahead of my Canadian fellow students in my academic placement by at least two years. So should I have to interrupt my studies next year, I could already expect to earn a fair teacher’s income.

My dear Biene, should I have used another hurtful word in my letter, please do not be offended, but let your anger burn and your wrath be directed at me.

Always in love with you,

Your Peter

calgary-zoo-L-15

Peter Contemplates a Second Opinion

March 15, 1966 Calgary

My dear Biene,

How I hate this tedious letter writing! What is being revealed in our lines is but a fraction of who we really are. And the long wait makes our hearts heavy and sad.

There are two new developments which I would like to quickly share with you. My kind professor of German literature spent two hours to discuss our problems with me in his office. For the beginning of our married life Dr. Cardinal advised against my idealistic plan of getting by without any form of birth control. He acknowledges the same danger I described to you, the danger of a shallow life style, followed later by  a complete disinterest in raising a family. Yet, according to him, this problem is more characteristic of the common person of vulgar disposition totally immersed in the pursuit of pleasure.

My professor believes that you and I have sufficient moral backbone to return to our ideals, when we will have acquired a solid financial base for raising a family. We should not shy away from taking advantage of what modern medical science can offer us. On such a complex and difficult issue I think I will have to sleep on it for a while.

Dr, Cardinal expressed his envy in a good-natured way for our happiness. He said that he regrets that he married so late and had listened to his mother. Her opinion was that at the age of 23 he was still too immature to get married.

He also believes that it is sometimes necessary to foster illusions with your parents to alleviate the pain of the final farewell. In that sense he is partly in agreement with you and even justifies your actions. As you can see, Dr. Cardinal has been like a father to me. He asked me to pass on his kindest regards and he is looking forward to meeting you.

Now quickly to the second news item: I have been very busy looking for a small apartment for us. I found out that the Italian family upstairs will be moving out soon. I had a good look at the apartment and immediately fell in love with it. Mind you, it has not been painted for years, but I saw the potential of what we could do with it. The rent is only $55. It is like a large doll house, but large enough for two people. There is also a basement suite available in the neighbourhood, which I will have to check out in the next couple of days. As you can see, I have been busy in the search of a more pleasant living space for the two of us. If only the dumb thoughts and worries about our future would leave me alone!

Always in love with you! Your Peter

Vigilant Knight

Exploring the history!

GenTraveling

Collecting stories from family historians who are climbing their family trees and planning trips to where their ancestors actually lived!

Creative Huntress' Journey

Story, Photography, and Lifestyle

Educated Unemployed Indian

Trying to benefit from education & (a little) from unemployment!

tanja britton

Lives and writes at the foot of Pikes Peak

Applegate Genealogy

Helping others discover their roots

Poetry and Prose

From soul to soul

Little Fears

Tales of humour, whimsy and courgettes

DaleDucatte.com

"Pay attention to the world." -- Susan Sontag

Deepa Kadavakat

Celebrate the ordinary & beautiful self

Susan Rushton

Celebrating gardens, nature, photography and a creative life

Backyard Photographer

Spark creativity by capturing the world around you one photo at a time

PETER GRAARUP WESTERGAARD

Independent blog about literature, philosophy and society in words and images

Floresphotographic

Photography & Nature

The Hejhej blog

Another blog that you dont need

The Flowers of Art

In the kingdom of life, with the strokes of the brush, the bow and the pen, artists have sowed their hearts to contrive, fields rivalling in beauty the Garden of Eden.

The Timeless Treasure

A Sneak Peek of My Life !!!

Theresa J. Barker

literary & science fiction writer

Jupp Kappius

Zur Erinnerung an Josef "Jupp" Kappius

Calmgrove

Exploring the world of ideas through books

Sophie und ihre Welt

Bücher - Fotos - Kurze Zeilen - Literaturkunde - Malen - Momentaufnahmen - Musik - Ohrensessel-Gedanken - Philosophie - Tagesfreuden - Therapie - Werken - Worte - Zitate

A Walk to Stressfree Life

be thankful for this blessed life!!!

Karolina Górska & Piotr Jurkiewicz

fotografia z naszej perspektywy

Melissa Blue Fine Art

Celebrating the Healing Beauty of Nature

melissabluefineartblog.wordpress.com/

Celebrating the Healing Beauty of Nature

The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Family Project

Reflections on Life, Family and Community

The Back Road Chronicles

Curious soul...and it makes me wanna take the back roads!

MaritimeMac

Go Explore

Inspire me

Love, Relationship, Lifestyle, Purpose, Marriage & Family

Travelling around the world

Traveller, photography

Intrepid Venture

Exploring the realms of the arts, sciences and politics

Megha Bose

A peek into Megha's mind

natureliteratureculturejournal

This is a journal about the things that inspire me: a beautiful landscape, a good book, a fascinating museum.

Candid Chicana

Chicano Culture, Self-Development & More

Frank Solanki

If you want to be a hero well just follow me

Plants and Beyond

Green Plants Based Living and Gardening

Zimmerbitch

age is just a (biggish) number

Think Ahead

Des' Online Journal

witlessdatingafterfifty

Relationships reveal our hearts.

Wondering and Wandering

"How vain it is to sit down to write when you have not stood up to live! Methinks that the moment my legs begin to move my thoughts begin to flow..." --Henry David Thoreau, August 19, 1851

Frau Stich-Schlinge

handGemachtes & allerlei Tüddellütt

Stella, oh, Stella

Garten - Reisen - Lesen - Musik - Handarbeiten - Motorbike no more! - Wandern ...

%d bloggers like this: