Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

The Red Fish are Coming

Every fall around this time of the year, the land-locked salmon enter our creeks and fight the current in search of their annual spawning grounds. They turn bright red as they complete their life cycle, spawn new life and die. This event puts eagles, ravens, and gulls on high alert because it is the time to fatten up for the long winter months. My wife and I witnessed the gulls in their feeding frenzy. Today’s post is a small visual report of the red fish’s life cycle. Enjoy.

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Tale of a Butterfly

Once upon a time, there was a butterfly. It was very trusting, or so it appeared to be. I discovered it on a water bottle cap sitting on top of the world.

How do I get off this water bottle? Should I fly or should I walk?

I guess I’ll walk. It’s such a short distance to the ground.

Why should I strain my wings?

Hurray! I made it. It’s time to get a little rest.

Oh no! The man with his big camera is coming too close for comfort. I’d better fly away.

Walter Panknin (1898 – 1977) and His Family Ch6 Part 22

Feeling Ashamed of the Old House of Rocky Docky

Biene wrote this post.

Angelika’s bedroom was huge and so bright and colourful.  She even had a piano in the middle of the room, and her mom made her play some tunes. Then she left us alone, and we spent some time in the park-like yard playing badminton on the lawn.  We had fun and laughed a lot.  Later we sat on her bed talking about school and joking about our teachers.

Biene and her friend Angelika

Suddenly I heard barking and a male voice.  Angelika’s dad, the manager of the municipal hydro corporation, had returned from his office with their German shepherd dog called Torro.  Angelika and Torro greeted each other exuberantly.  Angelika’s dad looked on with a big boyish smile on his face.   Then he turned to me.

“You must be that special girl I have heard so much about, “he said.   “Don’t be afraid of Torro; he is very gentle and would never hurt anyone.  Come and pet him so he gets to know you.”  Overcoming my fear, I managed to stroke Torro gently on the back, which he seemed to like.  He sat in front of me, staring at my face expecting more attention.  Angelika’s dad looked very easygoing and friendly.  He laughed a lot and made me feel at ease.

My first visit with Angelika and her parents at her beautiful place was coming to an end.  Her dad told us to go to his Volkswagen Beetle so he could drive me home.

“I’ll take Torro as well,” Angelika’s dad told me, “but he has to go in the car last.  He’ll get agitated and bark at you if he is in before you. He is very possessive of the car.”

When Angelika and I were settled on the backseats, Torro jumped in last, and I could see how happy and proud he was to sit beside his master. A car ride was a unique experience for me since we had never owned one.  We rode by bus or train and did a lot of walking and biking. Initially, I enjoyed the ride in the cute little Beetle, but the closer we came to my street, the more apprehensive I felt.  I did not want Angelika and her dad to see The Old House of Rocky Docky.  I felt ashamed to live in such a shabby small place and feared I would never be invited by Angelika again.I feigned carsickness and asked to walk the last stretch home.  I think Angelika’s dad sensed why I wanted to get off and let me go without protest.

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Sunset Walk at the Needles Ferry Landing

After a hot day, it feels good to walk along the beach near the Fauquier-Needles ferry landing. By the way, the ferry ride whether by car, truck, or as a foot passenger is free as all BC inland ferries are considered part of the provincial highway system. On the south side of the terminal, you see a large log boom that contains the lumber that the logging trucks haul out of the nearby forests. When enough logs have been collected, tugboats drag them south to Castlegar to the wood processing plants. I put the photos together into a video-slideshow. Enjoy.

Walter Panknin (1898 – 1977) and His Family Ch6 Part 21

Biene’s New Friend Angelika

Biene wrote this post.

It didn’t take us long to overcome our initial shyness, and we started to get to know each other during recess. Towards the end of the week, Angelika asked if I would be allowed to visit her on the last day of the school week. We could walk together to her place, and her dad would drive me home at night.

Biene and her Friend Angelika


My parents had no objections, and on Saturday, after early dismissal, we walked together to her home. It was a long walk to an unfamiliar part of town. There were lots of trees and beautiful yards. In Germany, most people do not own houses but live in apartments. Angelika stopped at a big cast-iron gate and opened it with a key. We walked through a long garden path to a big house with many windows. A slender young lady opened the front door. She had raven black hair and pale blue eyes. She kissed Angelika on the cheek with a gentle smile and then greeted me. I hadn’t expected Angelika’s mother to look so young. She served us some delicious little pastries in a bright sunroom. The delicate cakes looked like the ones I had longingly admired in the window of the fancy pastry shop in town. Finally, I tasted these small fruit tarts covered with strawberries and topped with whipped cream.
Frau Janzen asked me many questions about my family, interests, hobbies, and school. She had a gentle voice and kind eyes. After our refreshments, she showed me all the rooms in the beautiful house, and I was reminded of our big, wonderful home in Gotha, which we had lost. Our room at the Old House where we lived now was about the size of this sunroom.

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Sculptures of a Bygone Era

The readers who have been following me for some time will know from my posts that the Arrow Lakes are actually the mighty Columbia River that was dammed into a giant reservoir in the late 1960s. To make room for the project, many orchards and farms were destroyed. Entire forests were cut down. People lost their homes and had to move to higher grounds. Many left the area and never returned. As a result of this upheaval, tree stumps were submerged and only surface when the lake level is down in the dry summer months. I consider these leftovers as an opportunity to capture their stark beauty. Yesterday we took the canoe for a short trip north of the Needles Ferry landing where I found these beauties on the beach. My wife’s hat added that little bit of extra that the photographer in me is always in search of. Enjoy.

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