Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

The buds are finally waking up. Week 5

A heavy rain and mild temperatures were the start signal for the buds to grow. I am especially impressed with the magnolia flower for finally showing its splendid colour. The only plant having to be content with less light and a cooler microclimate and therefore far behind the other buds is the azalea. Next week I will conclude this mini-study on the budding development of four of our backyard plants. The cherry trees are now in full bloom and show off their brilliant bridal garments. Enjoy.

April Week 1 TextApril week 2 TextWeek 3week 4week 5

Bonus Photo: A Violet from our BackyardvioletS

 

 

New Look for the Klopp Family Blog

Switch to the Eighties Theme

It was time to make some improvements to my blog. I worked on the pages to make them more accessible. The pages created from the posts on my grandparents, uncles and aunts are now almost complete. Biene’s family still needs to be done. The German part of the menu has been revamped to allow readers to  locate articles more quickly.

I hope that you like the new look and I would appreciate to receive your feedback on the changes I have made. Have a great week!

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Meta Emma Klopp – Friedrich and Emma’s Fourteenth Child – Part 4

Denunciation by a Spiteful Housemaid

Vincenz’s wife did not overcome the family tragedy. Disputes with the husband and domestic quarrels were on the increase. Amalie Mülbert went her own separate way. In 1934 she was admitted to the Heidelberg Psychiatric Clinic. Vincent had to look after the four remaining children all by himself.

In this unfortunate private situation, a dangerous threat came about through the denunciation by the former housemaid, Appolonia Bitsch. Since 1933 the Nazis ruled in their fortress Mannheim. On 3 October 1934, the NS leader of “District Group Mannheim Quadrant 7” reported to his boss Fehrmann that the wife of the party member Friedrich had found out through her new housemaid Bitsch the following remark made by Professor Mülbert: “Adolf Hitler associates with loose women and prostitutes.” Frau Friedrich insisted that the case as related to “the charge of defamation of the Führer be officially recorded at the court of the Party.” Thus, the mechanism of the  new regime was set into motion.

Group leader Fehrmann passed on the original message to Mülbert’s school superintendent Heck. He demanded an inquiry and asked if the NS Party court, the school district office or the NS Teachers’ Association should deal with the matter. Heck, himself a member of the party, took due notice and arranged on 15 October 1934 further investigation by the school office leader Kuh. The noose around Mülbert’s neck was getting tighter, especially as the party and the office of the civil servants were working hand in hand together.

Mülbert’s file did not contain the official statements of the two informers. For that reason, Vincenz Mülbert was summoned to appear before the Gestapo (Geheime Staatspolizei) in Mannheim. His wife, in the middle of divorce proceedings, was being questioned in the meantime by the Gestapo.

To be continued …

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

The Slow but Steady Budding Process – Week 4

With daytime temperatures rarely going above 10 degrees C and continuing chilly nights, it is not surprising that my studies show an unusually slow progress in the development of the four plants: rose, lilac, magnolia and azalea . I am waiting for the magnolia flower to show its beauty before ending my studies. So we will go for another week or two. Our cherry tree is still holding back and is reluctant to display her bridal dress, which normally would be on display in the middle of April.  As a bonus photo, I will publish a photo of our lake and the local mountain with tons of snow on it still visible. Enjoy.

Bonus Photo

Ingarsol Mountain

Meta Emma Klopp – Friedrich and Emma’s Fourteenth Child – Part 3

The Tragic Loss of a Son

In 1910 the sons Werner (died in 1990) and Paul (died in 1932) were born in Weinheim. In 1910 came the transfer of their father to the renown senior high school in Mannheim, which was named after the French major and geographer “Tulla Oberschule”. The unremarkable years of a tranquil teacher’s existence were interrupted in the middle of World War I. In June 1916 Vincenz Mülbert was drafted into military service by the 14th Army Corps of the State of Baden. He served as a truck driver at the Recovery Unit I (Genesungsabteilung) of the Reserve Infantry Regiment 109. In October his daughter Hildegard was born in Mannheim.

During the static warfares in 1918, Vincenz took on active duty at the Aisne (east of Reims) and in the Upper Alsace. At the beginning of September 1918, he was declared “no useable for service at the front” on account of his highly strained nerves. As “being capable of garrison service”, he experienced the war’s end at the balloon battalion 139. On 22 November 1918, he received his demobilization papers and was released from his military service.

He returned to the former teaching post at the school in Mannheim. In May 1923, his wife Amalie gave birth to the twins Gertrud Ida and Hedwig Margarethe in Mannheim. In December followed the birth of the sixth and last child Rudolf Pius. It was according to a teacher’s news bulletin a premature birth. At that time the family possessed a home in Quadrant L of Mannheim.

From an application for financial assistance in September 1932 to the school administration one may be able to reconstruct the circumstances of a serious fateful event. The 19-year old son Paul, a commercial employee, suffered from depression and had already been receiving medical treatment for a long time. On 30 August 1932, he withdrew from his parental home and for ten days was reported missing. On the fourth of September, the Hessian police found his clothes on the banks of the riverbank of the River Main near Frankfurt. “Whether it was an accident or suicide could not be determined”. The body was retrieved from the river on the 7th of September, transferred to Mannheim and buried there. Mülbert already owed a large amount of money to the bank and was forced to borrow some more to cover the cost of transportation and burial expenses, He had asked for assistance in the amount of 258 marks.

To be continued …

Ireland 2019: Dublin’s Guinness Storehouse

Beer lovers and Irish Rovers fans, you will like today’s post by ‘crowcanyonjournal’.

Crow Canyon Journal

We had two hop-offs on our sightseeing bus tour of Dublin. The girls got off just past Dublin Castle to visit Dublin’s two great cathedrals, Christ Church and St Patrick’s. And the boys hopped off a few minutes later to tour the Guinness Storehouse, rated as the number one tourist attraction in Dublin. We would soon learn the story of Sir Arthur Guinness, who took over the St James Gate Brewery in 1759 and introduced his magic dark brew to the world.

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