Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Captured on the Way to the Waterfall

This is canoeing time. At our age especially when it is very hot we prefer our electric motor over the paddles. It also allows us to shoot images with greater precision concentrating on the beauties of nature all around us. At the Fauquier boat dock, we have the gulls relaxing on the log booms, one of our favourite themes. Past the island we visited last time, we navigated into the mouth of the Whatshan river. We needed to be careful, as the river banks are quite steep and there was no place to safely pull the canoe ashore. Lush vegetation greeted us, where ample moisture promoted plenty of growth. Surrounded by a carpet of daisies, a solitary mullein flower (Königskerze in German) attracted our attention. Finally, we arrived at the waterfall cascading into the bay of the Arrow Lake. The picture of the butterfly is a bonus taken in our garden. Enjoy.

25 Replies to “Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes”

  1. Sitting waiting, waders. water wings. Excuse me my creative wings took wind.. On Wednesday, September 2, 2020, The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Family Project wrote:

    > Peter Klopp posted: ” Wednesday’s Photos Captured on the Way to the > Waterfall This is canoeing time. At our age especially when it is very hot > we prefer our electric motor over the paddles. It also allows us to shoot > images with greater precision concentrating on the be” >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Peter, so enjoyed all your beautiful photos. What a wonderful way to relax, on your beautiful lake, in your canoe. Enjoy the rest of the summer. Here in Alaska, the leaves are turning yellow and falling and the air is crisp. Have a wonderful day!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, Fall comes early and is very short. But it is delightful while it lasts. We usually have snow in September and by the 10th of October, it usually stays until late April. Many birds are migrating south. Enjoy your weekend, Peter!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. We’re still in the heat of full summer, so it was especially nice to see your photos. It’s an odd but familiar phenomenon that after a hurricane places near to its passage often are hotter and more humid than usual because of the tropical air that arrives in its wake, so the thought of drifting through cool air with such lovely sights around me is doubly delightful. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We are still having a heat wave that has lasted for a long time even causing some forest fires not too far from us. Excursions in the cool early morning hours are therefore a particularly pleasurable experience. Thank you for your kind comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It’s interesting that Germans call mullein “king’s candle.” Kerze is apparently of Latin origin, though Wiktionary says that two Latin words have been conjectured as the source: “From Middle High German kerze, from Old High German kerza, charza, from either Latin cērāta (“covered with wax”) or Latin charta (“sheet of papyrus”, in this case referring to layers of birch bark from which candles were made). The latter explanation is typically preferred, though the former is semantically more suggestive.”

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Now that was very interesting, Steve. Thank you for this information. We have three enormous Königskerzen in the garden, I never had another word for them. Now I have several, King’s Candle 👑🕯 being a favourite.

      In German, it’s also called Donner- und Blitzkerze, Himmelsbrand, Kunkel, Unholdskerze, Wetterkerze, Winterblom, Wollblume oder Wollkraut. Die Königskerze (Verbascum densiflorum) war früher ein Symbol der Königswürde. Außerdem wurde die Pflanze der Jungfrau Maria zugeordnet. Sie trägt in vielen Darstellungen eine Königskerze in der Hand, den „Himmelbrand“.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Thank you, Steve, for the linguistic discourse on the etymological origin of the German word Kerze. It is interesting to note that most items that the ancient Germanic tribes did not have and came into contact with through the Romans have Latin roots in their words. Windows for example were unknown to them in the pre-Roman times (Fenster ->fenestra).

      Like

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