Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Canada Geese on the Fauquier Golf Course

As a direct consequence of global warming, the Canada geese that used to fly south to escape our harsh winters prefer to stay in the Arrow Lakes region. On the Fauquier golf course, they find lots of green grass, even though they may have to dig it up from under the snow. Recently, I observed snow geese which had joined the flocks of Canada geese. They seemed to get along quite well with their cousins. I created a very brief video documenting this rather rare event. Enjoy.

28 comments

  1. Debra · December 9

    They used to stop over in the Rhine Ruhr area in spring autumn before heading South or North but I think they stopped leaving that area about 15-20 years ago when the climate became too mild. Yeah, I think just at the onset of the new millennium. They’ve become a nuisance to open air pool owners etc. They used to be under protection but a certain number can be culled now each year. They eat the food of local geese and ducks, so the culling is even part of a environmental protection scheme. I saw about 10 swans flying over me recently. Although swans used to winter in Central Europe, the Finnish ones would head south. They don’t anymore. Or very late in the winter which I read somewhere is also a problem because they’re not as fat as at the end of the summer and they need their fat reserve for the long journey.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 10

      Geese in very large numbers can really become a nuisance, especially on a golf course. The things they leave behind are not nice to look at and to step on.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Amy · December 9

    The video is wonderful, but the reminder it brings of the consequences of global warming is so sad and so frightening.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pure Glory · December 9

    Peter, enjoyed watching your video. We won’t see Canadian geese until April or May in Interior Alaska. We know its Spring as they migrate to their breeding grounds.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Shepherd Cathy · December 9

    My cousin wrote a poem about geese. Grand subject .

    On Wednesday, December 9, 2020, The Peter and Gertrud Klopp Family Project wrote:

    > Peter Klopp posted: ” Wednesday’s Photos Canada Geese on the Fauquier Golf > Course As a direct consequence of global warming, the Canada geese that > used to fly south to escape our harsh winters prefer to stay in the Arrow > Lakes region. On the Fauquier golf course, they f” >

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Robert Parker · December 9

    I’ve never seen the Canada and Snow geese mingling like that, very nice! I’ve gotten used to seeing the Canada geese year-round, they seem impervious to cold.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Stella, oh, Stella · December 9

    I love the video – again with nice music!
    When we lived in Sweden (about 18 years ago), the Canada geese were winter guests in Skåne, the south of Sweden. Five years later, back in Denmark, many of the gray geese and other small birds did not leave for the south anymore during winter.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Peter , you video of Canadian geese with snow geese is such a delight to watch, thank you for sharing. May I ask you, do you edit your videos or are they right of the camera, or do you use a device or source to edit your videos? As you can watch the Canadian geese, I can see the dolphins going by being so playful. Enjoy the coming 3.Advent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 10

      Cornelia, I am so glad you like the video. You guessed right. I am using a video editor to produce these movies. I am using the VideoPad programme from NCH. The basic version is free. Have a great day! It must be fun to see the dolphins go by.

      Like

  8. shoreacres · December 9

    The Canada and Snow Geese will mingle here in the fields. We have large flocks that spend the winter with us; their arrival always is a wonderful treat.I don’t see as many as I used to, but that’s a result of them shifting to other parts of the state as development takes place and the crops they enjoy are grown in different places.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 10

      For me it was entirely new that the goose species would mingle with each other.

      Like

  9. arv! · December 10

    Interesting. This is the first time I have heard about Canada Geese

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Des · December 10

    Nice video, Peter. I see and hear Canadian geese quite often in our rural setting. There are times when they fill entire wheat fields in this area. I often wonder if they’re arriving from the cold north or simply moving around this area all winter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 10

      It is more likely that the Canada geese simply move around to supplement their diet. Thanks for the compliment, Des!

      Like

  11. crowcanyonjournal · December 10

    Nice video, Peter! I also like the old country piano music!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 11

      Thank you! I am so glad you liked the video and the music.

      Like

  12. Steve Schwartzman · December 10

    In addition to mingling with each other, how readily does each group of geese let people get close to them?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · December 11

      There are city geese that are used to people walking through the parks. The wild geese in the country however are extremely wary when you approach them closer than 100 m. To get a good shot you would have to hide behind a tree and wait until they approach you.

      Like

  13. Ankur Mithal · December 20

    No racial prejudice on either side 😉

    Like

  14. Peter Klopp · December 20

    The geese are setting a fine example of peaceful coexistence, Ankur.

    Like

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