Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Juniper Berries, Moss, and Oregon Grapes

Last week a major wind and rain storm was pounding the Southern Interior of BC knocking out a number of power stations and leaving thousands of households without electricity. With temperatures rising to 10 degrees C in some areas most of the snow has melted away in our valleys. When the sun came out last Thursday, January 15, my wife and I went to our favourite look-out to capture some of the plants covered with sparkling hoarfrost and dew drops. I brought so many photos home from the foray in the early morning light that I decided to break my 5-picture rule. I know you don’t mind. Enjoy.

34 comments

  1. Pure Glory · January 20

    Beautiful!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pit · January 20

    Beautiful pictures. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Robert Parker · January 20

    Peter, those frost crystals are remarkable. One of my grandmothers used to sometimes preserve flower petals and berries with sugar, to decorate cakes, and these frosted leaves remind me of that, great shots.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ulli · January 20

    Der Winter kann herrlich malen! Wunderschöne Bilder, lieber Peter.
    Liebe Grüße
    Ulli

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      Danke, liebe Ullli!

      Like

      • Ulli · January 22

        So gerne, lieber Peter!
        (ich vermisse dich ein bisschen in meinem Café…)

        Like

  5. Stella, oh, Stella · January 20

    I am glad that you broke your rule, Peter! The storm is howling, but nature is still beautiful. I love those plants/plant parts in the snow, and then the crystals, wow! Some of the leaves also have small ice thorns on them. I think those you only get, when it thaws and freezes over again quickly.
    I had that one day, one winter, in one of my gardens, and then never again. Luckily I took photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      I like your explanation of how ice thorns are being formed, Birgit. It makes a lot of sense.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Stella, oh, Stella · January 22

        It is a theory, but I think it holds. I attach the photo, the whole garden was like this, and then I never saw anything like it again.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. crowcanyonjournal · January 20

    Nice rule-breaking, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. danielwalldammit · January 20

    Frost is gorgeous, particularly on those red leaves.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. shoreacres · January 20

    I spotted your juniper berries right away. The trees obviously differ from ours, but those berries are recognizable. All of the frost crystals are beautiful; I’m glad you included them all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      Here at the Arrow Lakes the juniper actually grow on low bushes. My wife occasionally picks them and adds them to sauerkraut.

      Like

  9. Peter, thank you for your beautiful frosty captures, especially the Juniper Berries.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      Thank you, Cornelia. The juniper berries with their smiling faces are also very special to me.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      I need to tell you that while I was responding to your heart-felt comment on my brothers’ flight from the Red Army I must have pressed some keys that made my response and your comment disappear. Sorry about that!

      Like

  10. Amy · January 21

    I can FEEL the frostiness of those. Just remarkable. What is the one that looks like crystals? How did you do that?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      They are indeed ice crystals taken in this extreme close-up photo and cropped out later with my photo editing program.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Su Leslie · January 21

    I’m glad you broke your rule. There are all stunning photos Peter.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. arv! · January 22

    Lack of snow in the peak winter must be a cause of concern? On the other hand, it allowed you to explore your backyard

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 22

      It rained a lot in the valleys, which is highly unusual for this time if the year, but that means that there is plenty snow on the mountains.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Steve Schwartzman · January 22

    What photo fun you had with frost and rime.
    The frozen water makes your pictures rhyme.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. kopfundgestalt · January 22

    Das vorletzte Foto besonders schön, Peter!

    Ich habe das Gefühl, immer weniger Zeit zu haben. Diese vielleicht 17 Stunden des Tages…übervoll, übervollst.
    Hoffe, morgen deinen Bericht über WW2 weiter zu lesen.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. PlantsandBeyond · January 23

    Really beautiful capture of completely different natural state from my own – nevertheless stunning

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Labby · January 24

    Danke für diese wunderbaren Aufnahmen bei Frost. Die Pflanzenfotos gefallen mir besonders gut. Liebe Grüße Wolfgang

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Ankur Mithal · January 30

    Beautiful pictures. Though we have a winter, in relative terms it is mild. When you go UP to 10C we mostly talk about going DOWN to 10C and freezing 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · January 30

      I guess there would not be any heating systems in most homes in India if the temperature was going DOWN to 10C.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ankur Mithal · January 30

        That is true. Our homes are more geared for handling the hot weather, which is long and severe. Though the winter is mild, sometimes it becomes uncomfortable as we are not well equipped for it. Of course, 10C was to make a point to your post. Min temperatures in the plains go down to about 5C regularly with an occasional 1 or 2C thrown in. As you go up into the Himalayas, you cross into sub-zero.

        Liked by 1 person

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