Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Thistle Seed head

While camping on the Needle’s side of the Lower Arrow Lake, I observed the transformation of a thistle from a purple flower into a seed head. Most people do not find the final stages of any flower very attractive. Perhaps the image of decay and death troubles them, as they are overlooking the new beginning of life in the presence of myriads of seeds. While a dandelion seed resembles a tiny parachute, the thistle seed looks more like a feathery ball that can travel large distances before it lands on the ground. The wind strongly blew when I took the picture. But the single seed on the upper right was well anchored by a spider’s web string. Enjoy.

13 Replies to “Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes”

  1. Many seed stages of plants are very pretty, my clematis springs to mind for example, and the ones with the orange lanterns. The thistle seed looks a bit like a miniature tumbleweed. I agree that this “dying” stage is actually a new beginning. We can learn so much from nature, if we choose.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice captures, Peter. I also happen to be among those who enjoy the different shapes and textures seed heads present. I always try to figure out what plants they belong to, which is often quite the challenge when I didn’t see the flower in bloom. It’s an entire science to itself.

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  3. That thistle seed will eventually travel somewhere that needs a thistle plant. All stages of a plant’s life are worthy subjects to appreciate, just as with us. We become more interesting and possess a different sort of appeal as we age which is a plus.

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  4. Decay in any form is never visually appealing. But then everyone has their own idea of beauty. These flowers are not found in our region; I have seen them in the Himalayas though.

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  5. Nature finds a way. I am not able to find the scientific or English name, but in the Indian summer we used to have a particular seed that grew silky white hair so that it could be transported through flying as a means of propagation. As children we called it ‘Budia ke baal’ in Hindi or ‘Hair of an old lady’ perhaps because they were white and silky.

    Like

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