Baroness Anna von Waldenfels (née Klopp) – Part XIII

Georg’s Pipe Dream

Pulling the right strings at the right authorities, Georg von Waldenfels managed to acquire from the DAG the trusteeship over the ‘abandoned’ estate property at Angern on the River March between Lower Austria and Slovenia. As a trustee he worked there for two months from August 3 to October 1, 1938.

His ultimate goal was by hook or by crook to take possession of the property of the Jewish family Löw, who had owned and worked this large parcel of land of prime agricultural land for many generations. The DAG (Deutsche Ansiedlungsgesellschaft), the so-called German Settlement Agency, had set into motion punitive court proceedings against the Löw family to the tune of 13 million Reichsmark (RM). Eight million RM were covered by the sale of all movable equipment. Remained the five million RM, which the DAG desired to collect. To fully comprehend the value of the entire estate, one can easily peg the sale’s price on today’s real estate market at around 100 million dollars. The commissioned administrator von Waldenfels bragged among friends that he could easily come up with the five million RM. Through marriage he had connected with father-in-law Jan F. Jannink, “one of the wealthiest mega-industrialists of Holland, who would throw the five million RM on the table with a smile.”

Von Waldenfels had also set his eyes on the palace-like mansion of the Löw family located at the 19th District of Vienna. This stately and historically important residence also belonged to the total ‘aryanized’ property of the SS. The low ranking SS officer of Lagowitz, swept up by his incredible pipe dreams, now beyond all reasonable dimensions appeared to drift away into the fantasy world of his own desires.

23 comments

  1. thecedarjournal · July 26, 2019

    This story is a chilling example of what greed will make people do. Mind boggling and sad.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Peter Klopp · July 26, 2019

      Let’s hope that the world learns a valuable lesson from these examples of horror.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Pure Glory · July 26, 2019

    Incredible story of selfishness and forgetting to treat others as you would want to be treated.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Amy · July 26, 2019

    So many Jews had their property expropriated by the Nazis and selfish people like Georg. This post reminded me of The House by the Lake by Thomas Harding. Have you read that book? It’s about one house and the five different families that owned it over the course of about 150 years.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · July 26, 2019

      I heard so much about this book. I will put it on my shopping list. I believe they even made a movie out of it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Amy · July 26, 2019

        I don’t know about the movie, but it tells the recent history of Germany in a dramatic and often heart-breaking way—from the 19th century aristocracy to the Soviet-era in East Germany.

        Liked by 1 person

    • kopfundgestalt · July 27, 2019

      that sounds interesting. I think I buy it. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • Amy · July 27, 2019

        Let me know what you think.

        Liked by 2 people

      • kopfundgestalt · July 27, 2019

        It will take some time. I ordered it today and I will fetch it on the local bookstore next town. I just like to support the local stores.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Amy · July 27, 2019

        That’s great! I hope you find it as interesting as I did.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Peter Klopp · July 31, 2019

        I have read the first dozen chapters or so and I must say I am absolutely delighted with the author’s handling of this important material. Often such books are biased in one direction or another. This one is refreshingly different. Thanks for the tip, Amy!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Amy · July 31, 2019

        I am glad you are enjoying it. I also found it fairly presented and well-written and also heart-breaking and fascinating.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Peter Klopp · August 2, 2019

        I know now why you recommended the book to me. There so many parallels to the Anna von Waldenfels story. Thanks agin, Amy!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Amy · August 2, 2019

        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Peter Klopp · July 27, 2019

        I will let you know, Amy.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. kopfundgestalt · July 27, 2019

    What’s up with Lagowitz? Did I miss something?
    Self-enrichment had been method then.
    Last year I read the biography of Speer and there it da a diferent dimension, for example large areas in Berlin.
    I wonder why Georg came through so easily? Did he have such high merit in the SS? Or was he just simply crafty ?!
    In any case, such “profits” were always short-lived.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · July 27, 2019

      I think the latter was the case. He was very crafty, but all his craftiness did not help him in the end, as you will see on my next post. Of course, he was also lucky to have a high ranking officer in Sepp Dietrich to support him.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Ann Coleman · July 28, 2019

    Yet another example of what happens when we worship riches and power….. So very sad!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Stella, oh, Stella · July 29, 2019

    All this must have split up the family. I mean what did his mother say to his goings-on?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Ankur Mithal · August 11, 2019

    Remarkable story. Often we stay limited to the lives of rulers and conquerors when reading history. But, each individual is making a history of his/ her own. Maybe at a smaller scale, but, in many cases, no less interesting.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · August 16, 2019

      So true, Ankur! I firmly believe that each human being has an interesting story to tell. Too bad, only a few the effort to write them down.

      Liked by 2 people

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