Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

Winter Retreating Slowly from the Arrow Lakes

Last weekend under a bright sunny sky, my wife and I went for a leisurely stroll over the local golf course in search of more signs of spring. More and more patches of green had emerged from under the snow. The Canada geese were honking happily at the sight of some fresh grass. The catkins were ready to blow their pollen into the wind,  buds even on the pine trees were already swelling, and the clouds darkening Ingarsol Mountain added drama to the otherwise cheerful scene. Enjoy.

35 comments

  1. Ulli · April 1

    Nun kommt auch der Frühling zu euch! Zauberhafte Bilder sind das wieder, lieber Peter!
    Herzliche Grüße
    Ulli

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · April 1

      Die erste Krokus Blume steckte zaghaft ihren Hals aus dem Boden. Herzliche Grüße und bleib gesund, liebe Ulli!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Pit · April 1

    Wunderschoene Bilder! 🙂 Also haelt jetzt auch bei Euch der Fruehling Einzug.
    Liebe Gruesse, und bleibt gesund,
    Pit

    Liked by 1 person

  3. cindy knoke · April 1

    Herrlich!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. PlantsandBeyond · April 1

    Just look at his beauty-catkins are my fave image here

    Liked by 1 person

  5. crowcanyonjournal · April 1

    Nice pictures, Peter! Blue skies here in California, too. Also, clean air — cleanest air in decades. No cars on freeways. No smog.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · April 2

      There must be something positve coming out of the pandemic. Yea!

      Like

  6. Pure Glory · April 1

    Beautiful! A oasis of color and beauty! Thank you, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Stella, oh, Stella · April 1

    Spring is coming, yay!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Su Leslie · April 1

    How heartening g to see signs of spring. Stay safe Peter.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Amy · April 1

    I wish I had your ability to capture wildlife the way you do. We took a lovely walk this afternoon and saw geese and swans, but my photos are a blur.

    I was surprised to read that you have a golf course nearby. Somehow I imagined you living too far from civilzation to be near one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · April 2

      It’s not full golf course, it has only nine holes, but it is such a popular spot overlooking our lake that many golfers come a long distance to play here at our tiny village.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. arv! · April 1

    So scenic and pristine

    Liked by 1 person

  11. As usual splendid captures of Yours, Peter, your photography is really amazing. Thank you for sharing. Here in Southern California, all the wild flowers are blooming so wonderfully, I still go for walks in the nature, because it is so soothing for me. Stay safe and healthy my friend.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · April 2

      It must be uplifteing to go for a walk through a landscape filled with the colours of spring, Cornelia.

      Like

  12. shoreacres · April 1

    All of the photos are wonderful, but I’ll confess that the little patch of remaining snow is especially appealing. I suppose that’s because time’s a-passing, and those of us on the Texas coast know what’s coming: warm, hot, and flat miserable! What are the tubular green thingies? I think they must be a rush, or some other kind of aquatic plant. It’s a neat photo.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Peter Klopp · April 2

      I would like to know myself what these tubular green thingies are. They must have kept their colour in spite of being covered by snow all winter long. Thanks for the compliment!

      Like

  13. Ann Coleman · April 2

    I don’t know about you, but I find the signs of Spring very uplifting in these troubled times. Thank you so much for these gorgeous photos, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · April 2

      Going out for our daily walks is also uplifting, while nature prompts me to capture her beauty. Thank you, Ann!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Steve Schwartzman · April 3

    Horsetails always make for interesting photographic subjects. The article at

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2011/08/01/hunting-horsetails

    makes this connection:

    “Horsetails have jointed segments telescoping one into the next, the segments getting smaller toward the growing apex. The segments grow smaller in such a regular way that the seventeenth-century Scottish mathematician John Napier, it is said, was inspired by them to invent logarithms.”

    Let’s hope that’s true.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · April 3

      Again, many thanks to you, my botanist! This will answer also somebody else’s question.

      Like

  15. I’m so happy to see the signs of spring in your area! Is the first photo a “catkin.” I’ve never heard of that (we don’t have them where I live) but I love the colors and how they drape over. Beautiful photos, Peter!

    Like

    • Peter Klopp · April 7

      You are right, Janis, they are catkins. When the wind blows throw through them, they create clouds of pollen that some people are allergic to. Thank you for the compliment! I appreciate it very much.

      Like

  16. kopfundgestalt · April 6

    Wunderbare Bilder, Peter!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Ankur Mithal · April 18

    Brilliant. Esp the last picture. Captures the retreat of winter quite literally.

    Liked by 1 person

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