Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Nature – The Greatest Artist

Let your eyes roam over a beautiful landscape and you will discover nature’s artwork in a stunning mountain scenery, in a cascading waterfall, in the undulating waves of the ocean, or in the small world of flowers and insects visiting them. Today, my focus is on the driftwood sculptures shaped by the natural forces like wind, sun and frost. These photos were all taken on a recent excursion to ‘our’ island. Enjoy.

Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lakes

Wednesday’s Photos

First Sunny Weekend in 2020

On the first Sunday in February, my wife and I decided to take advantage of the first sunshiny weekend of the year. The road down to our favourite campsite was so buried in deep snow that we had to park our car on the main road. Fortunately, the partially melted snow cover had frozen so hard that we could easily walk down to the beach without any trouble. The sun felt warm in spite of the subzero temperature. It was an invigorating hike, and the photos, which I took home and I have chosen for today’s post,  were an additional bonus. Enjoy.

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Natural Splendour of the Arrow Lake

Of Nature’s Artistry and Man’s ‘Inukshuk’ at the Lakeshore

Driftwood sculptures abound along the shorelines of the Arrow Lake. While canoeing on the lake south of Fauquier, I discovered some more, which I would like to share with you. There are also man-made structures that campsite visitors have set up following their artistic urges. Viewing them, I felt inspired to build an ‘inukshuk’ myself. Strictly speaking, these stone structures are not inukshuks. The latter have their origin in the monuments of the Inuit people in the Canadian Arctic. Among the stones, I found one that appeared to have a smiling face and in a precarious balancing act, I managed to put it on top of two other bigger stones. Enjoy.

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Splendour of the Arrow Lake

Wednesday’s Photos

Exploring the Island across the Lake

In the late 60’s BC Hydro flooded the valley after building a dam to provide some control over the fluctuating water levels of the Columbia River. The stretch between Galena Bay in the north and the town of Castlegar in the south is known as the Upper and Lower Arrow Lakes. But BC Hydro’s main purpose was to generate electricity. Thousands of people were forced to leave their land along the lake shore. The island, which my wife and I canoed to, was once connected to the land on the opposite side of the Columbia River.  Before the dam was built, the island was rich farm land with an orchard and a farm on it. As you can see, two weeks ago the forests nearby were still burning with a lot of smoke in the air. We are grateful for the rain, the end of the wildfire and the clean air we can breathe again. Enjoy the photos.

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The Fauquier – Needles Ferry

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Looking East where the Fires were Burning

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Driftwood Sculptures on the Island

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Driftwood Arch

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A Sprinkling of Red from the Rose Hips

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View through the Trees onto the Lake

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Nature’s Sculptures Everywhere