Like-minded People of Applegrove Road – Conclusion

A BRIEF HISTORY OF APPLEGROVE ROAD

By late Bill Laux

In 1969 Elsje De Boer and her husband from Calgary bought the old Aspinall place at the Fauquier end of Applegrove Road. Starting in 1976 they used it for summer outings. The following year Elsje had Bill Jeffries build a sleeping cabin on the place. In 1987 her son built her a permanent house and after Jim Huth and Bill Laux completed the interior finishing, she moved in.

The Arrow Lake that attracted Like-Minded People on Applegrove Road

The Arrow Lake that attracted Like-Minded People on Applegrove Road

In 1979 Robin and Dorothy Huth, from Calgary, with the Madills and Stevensons were able to buy lakefront lot 8099 from Weinberg, a Portland, Oregon real estate speculator. This man had for years had an agent in Victoria instructed to put a $50 bid on every piece of waterfront property in British Columbia that came up for Tax Sale. By the time of the dam construction in 1967 it turned out that he owned between 100 and 200 properties on Arrow Lake. Robin Huth and his son, Jim, were able to put in a steep, many switch backed road to access it from Applegrove Road. In 1980 Jim and Rae Ann Huth built a lakefront cabin at the foot of this road and moved in. Jim began building his parents a house nearby. The Madills, rejecting the difficulties of the access road, bought in Fauquier instead. The Stevensons went to New Zealand.

Eric Arnold, a millwright from Squamish, bought lakeshore lot 8098, probably from Weinberg, about this time and built a small house on float logs, which he moored at the lakeshore. Unfortunately, a storm the next year wrecked the unprotected structure. His wife was not comfortable in so isolated a location, so the Arnolds left.

Jim and Rae Ann Huth left about 1990 for Vancouver Island and Robin and Dorothy lived in happy near-seclusion in their lakeshore home until medical problems required a move to Salmon Arm. They sold it as a retirement property to a German couple, Sabine and Karl-Heinz Mocikat, about 2000. Jim and Rae Ann’s cabin was rebuilt to a house by Bob and Monique Gellatly, an Ontario couple, who lived there for a few years, while he worked locally as a plumber. It was later bought as a summer place by Borowski, an engineer from Calgary, who is building a second house on it,

The first telephone line came up Applegrove Road in 1979 and BC

Hydro followed when the Burmeisters from Germany bought the Bruner place from Peter Makar’s wife in 1990. They had the lovely “cedar tunnel,” a true scenic treasure, felled on the lower part of the Applegrove Road and hydro poles run into their place. The Burmeisters set up resort accommodations down on the lake and operate as Kokanee Bay Resort and Farm.

In 1994 the Hydro lines were extended up Applegrove Road to Glasheens, Nila Campbell an4 Eichenauers. Jimmi Mead stuck with her solar power as she still does.

Lillian Liberty bought part of the old Sherwood property next to Lee Helle in 1989 and had a house built with a magnificent view of the lake below and Edgewood opposite. Like many earlier Applegrove residents she depends on solar and water power for electricity.

View from Taite Creek South to Helle's Lakeshore Propery

View from Taite Creek South to Helle’s Lakeshore Propery

In 1994 the Highways Department was still insisting on calling and signing Applegrove Road as “Fauquier Upper Road,” a vague and meaningless name. Bill Laux, having got agreement from all the landholders along the road, petitioned Highways for a change of name, as the Applegrove Site was still Iisted on B.C. Government maps. On November 23,1994, Highways conceded, and “Fauquier Upper Road” became officially “Applegrove Road” and was so signed.

Hydro power was extended from Burmeisters to Bumpus and Laux in 1996 and the days of kerosene lamps, carrying messages to town by horseback and noisy diesel generators were now over for them.

A new couple, Marney and Zane Kushniryk bought Nila Campell’s “Retreat Centre” in 1999 and moved in the next year to build two unique and secluded rental cabins as a source of income.

Ken and Denise Douglas arrived about the same time, buying one of the Haugland lots above Elsje De Boer’s.

Canadians, Americans, Germans, Dutch, there is still a strong and unique degree of like-mindedness among most of the residents of Applegrove Road. For nearly a hundred years the dusty road to Taite Creek and beyond has supported a succession of groups of homesteaders, communitarians and others eager to invent their own ways of living. They value the area for what it is, an unspoiled and undeveloped area of mountain slope and lakefront, whose residents still grow much of their food and live as their convictions have told them they must.

Like-Minded People of Applegrove Road – Part I

LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE

A BRIEF HISTORY OF APPLEGROVE ROAD

By late Bill Laux

Applegrove Road takes its name from an early real estate development at the mouth of Taite Creek. Sometime before 1912, real estate promoters, probably from Edmonton, bought lot 6904 and had that thin slice of lakefront north and south of Taite Creek cleared and apple trees planted on it. One street, Edmonton Avenue, was laid out running north and south and crossing Taite Creek on a bridge. Lots on the lake shore side of the street were one acre in size. On the other side larger lots were available.

Start of Applegrove Road

Start of Applegrove Road

A trail was slashed through from the development to Fauquier. This was not intended to be a road but rather a trail down which Fauquier farmers could bring their teams to clear and log the company’s land. This trail established the route now followed by Applegrove Road.

Read More

Needles – a Town that is no More Part II

A Tractor Snowplow Crossing the Lake

A Tractor Snowplow Crossing the Lake

Story and Photos contributed by Annette Devlin

Also, as the lake froze over in the winter, mail was transported by horse and sleigh from Burton over the ice.

A403

Needles had also been a logging centre. In 1922, it had a large log flume for logs that ran for four miles from the Whatshan to the Arrow Lakes, at one place where it crossed the road it was 12 feet above.

Log Flume Four Miles Long

Log Flume Four Miles Long

Due to the flooding of the Arrow Reservoir the town site of Needles no longer exists. However, the properties both north and south above the high water line are still occupied.

Ferry Service in the early 1920's

Ferry Service in the early 1920’s

As reported the first ferry to cross the Arrow Lakes between Needles and Fauquier was a 6 HP launch in 1919. In 1922, a raft towed by Mr. O.J.Aspinall’s rowboat was used. By 1924, hourly daily service was started by Mr. George Craft consisting of a boat for foot passengers and a raft for vehicles powered by a small boat called the “Kathleen.” In 1928, Claude Rollins was engaged to give better service with a larger boat. In 1931 a three-car ferry was installed. 1941 saw an eight-car cable ferry put into use. As the years went on, the increase in traffic warranted larger ferries and more hours of operation.

Fauquier as seen from the Needles Side

Fauquier with its Large Orchard as Seen from the Needles Side

Fauquier Historical Review

Fauquier Preempted in 1897 by Funk Brothers

Report by Late Mrs. W.L.Devlin

Text and Photo Credits: ALHS and Mrs. Annette Devlin

One of the new town sites on the Arrow Lakes, due to the Arrow Dam Reservoir, is at Fauquier, called New Fauquier . This name never got into real use (PK). It is situated above the high water line laid out on part of the farm land mentioned in the following article, written ten years ago.

Fauquier-Needles Ferry

Fauquier-Needles Ferry in the Early 1920’s with Large Orchard on the Fauquier Side

The new settlement is a modern village with sewers, lots and the streets all engineered to separate the residential areas from business and services area, to make an efficient and attractive community. We print this story as a tribute to the early settlers of this area and to wish them well in the new town.

Ferry Landing

Old Ferry Landing

Mrs. W.L.Devlin’s Report (1967)

Canada celebrates its centennial this year, so I will endeavor to relate the history of our community. Prior to 1895 there were no settlers in Fauquier. Trappers and prospectors built cabins and stayed for a while, then moved on. Names mentioned by old timers are P. Anders, Jim Kelly, Muirhead, Jim Bates and Dougelle, who staked a mining claim on Stor Hill. The little cabin he built near the beacon point is still standing.

In 1897 Leonard Funk and brother George came from the Okanagan and preempted two large blocks of land. They built a cabin by the lake and began clearing, cutting trees into the cord wood, which they sold to the CPR for use in their wood-burning boats. George Funk did not stay, but his brother Leonard carved a fine farm from the forest, planted an orchard and raised a large herd of cattle, becoming a fairly wealthy man. He did much to help his neighbors get established and was a prominent figure in community affairs until his death in 1935.

Two other settlers of 1897 were Mr. Mosheimer who stayed only a few years and Mr. Thompson who preempted a half section of land next to Mr. Funk. He also bought the mining claim from Dougelle. When his sons joined the army in 1914, the family moved away.

Jim Kelly mentioned previously homesteaded the original Fauquier farm. He sold to Muirhead who in turn sold to Mr. Fauquier in 1900. After acquiring three more lots Mr. Fauquier called his holdings the Needles ranch. This property he had surveyed into ten-acre blocks, the work being completed by A. H. Green in 1910. Part of Mr. Green’s payment was a choice lakeshore block, on which he built a summer home.

At this point it might be of interest to tell a little about Mr. Fauquier. He hired Indians to clear the land on both sides of the road, approaching the landing. He built a fine home hiring two Chinese to care for the house and the gardens. Incidentally, this house burned and the family moved to a little cottage on the north side of the road. In appearance, Mr. Fauquier looked like a country squire, florid face, and gray hair, neat clipped moustache always dressed in natty tweeds. He had fine horses and drove an elegant buggy with a fringed top.

He planted a large orchard and while waiting for it to come into production he put in acres of raspberries and strawberries. Between the sale of land, fruit and cattle, he should have been successful but his extravagance exceeded his income and he died a poor man in 1917. Mrs. Fauquier was a semi- invalid and recluse. After spending her last years in a wheel chair she died at Vancouver in 1929. Read More

Fauquier’s Namesake was Guilty of Graft

Frederick George Fauquier – Part II

Report to the Arrow Lakes News by Greg  Nesteroff

From the Archives of the Arrow Lakes Historical Society

What Arrow Lakes community is named after a man jailed for embezzlement? The answer, likely to surprise many, is Fauquier. Frederick George Fauquier’s incarceration was a severe aberration in an otherwise distinguished career that included many government appointments. Indeed, he emerged from prison virtually unscathed: no one seemed to think any less of him for it.  Born in Woodstock, Ontario, to an Anglican bishop, Fauquier came to West Kootenay in 1893 and was appointed mining recorder, police officer, and notary public at Nakusp.

His diligent service was recognized in 1900 when he was transferred to Revelstoke and named stipendiary magistrate, justice of the peace, government agent, assistant lands and works commissioner, assessor and collector, vital events registrar, and gold commissioner. Something, however, went wrong. In August 1901, a government auditor was dispatched to Revelstoke to look into irregularities in the gold commissioner’s office. Fauquier was arrested at home and charged with misappropriating $100 in public funds while mining recorder at Nakusp. He was released on $2,500 bail.

“The greatest regret is expressed in town at this unfortunate affair as Mr. Fauquier is not only personally popular but has proved himself both at Nakusp and here a most acceptable and capable official,’’ the Revelstoke Herald wrote. The Kootenay Mail added Fauquier “had many warm friends” who would have repaid the money had they known it was missing before the auditor arrived.

“It is evident that Mr. Fauquier had been making an effort to straighten matters up as he has been offering for sale his ranch in the lower country,” the newspaper said.

When Fauquier next appeared before a judge, he was further charged with stealing $2,097 in land sale money between Oct. 15, 1900 and Aug. 21, 1901 at Revelstoke as well as $811 in taxes collected from the Imperial Bank on June 22, 1901. The earlier Nakusp charge was dropped. The auditor produced a list of land transactions for which no receipts existed, ranging from $3 to $213. The auditor also presented a statement showing Fauquier received $819 in taxes, while the books recorded only $8. Fauquier was committed for trial, and released again on $12,000 bail. Several more prominent businessmen stepped forward to post sureties.

A few weeks later, however, Fauquier pleaded guilty. The motivation for the crimes was never explained. His lawyer only said he took the money “to pay claims that other men would have ignored.”

And while there was no justification for the offense, “it had always been Mr. Fauquier’s intention to replace these monies,” the Kootenay Mail wrote.

“Mr. Fauquier had a wife dependent on him and also a family, and was without other means than this property. He was prepared, if he got his liberty at no distant date, to repay every cent he had taken.”

The judge sentenced him to two years in the provincial penitentiary. It’s not clear how much time he served (nor if he ever repaid the money he stole), but around 1904, he returned to his ranch, later known as Fauquier’s Landing, or just Fauquier, and began growing fruit. Overall, despite his transgressions, Fauquier’s kept his reputation intact. In 1911, he was spoken of as a potential candidate for provincial office, and upon his death in 1917 at age 65, his obituary was adulatory.

“Always of a bright and cheerful nature Mr. Fauquier was universally liked and highly respected by all who came in contact with him,” the Nelson Daily News wrote. “He was the most extensive fruit grower on the lake, his orchards being considered among the models of British Columbia.”

Fauquier was buried in Nakusp. Although his crimes were whispered of in his namesake community, they are not recorded in any history book.

 Gavel