Friedrich Wilhelm Ferdinand Klopp (1879-1952) – Part VI

Ferdinand Withdraws from the Harsh Realities of Postwar Germany

Before the end of WWII, perhaps in 1944, Ferdinand purchased a larger house in Rhinow, Brandenburg, to secure it as a retirement home. The former hotel, which the now 65 year-old Ferdinand remodeled for private residential use, was located at Dorfstraße 58. Here the entire Ferdinand Klopp family experienced the end of war and a new beginning. The family at that time also included their daughters and sons-in-law, who had returned from the war and POW camps.

Rhinow Town Church - Photo Credit: wikipedia.org

Rhinow Town Church – Photo Credit: wikipedia.org

The invasion forces of the Red Army declared the building as a Soviet command post. Family documents and photos were permanently lost during the ‘liberation’. The Polish language skills of mother Rosalie, who had been speaking German for the past 50 years and is being described as kind-hearted, hospitable woman, kept her daughters out of harm’s way from the Soviet soldateska notorious for raping girls and women of all ages during and after the end of WWII.

When for property owners life became more and more unbearable in the GDR, embittered Ferdinand began to give away his furniture, farm animals and estates to the people in Rhinow. He transferred title of his house at Dorfstraße 58 to his daughter Margarete Rocke and her two children.

River Havel at Lake Wannsee - Photo Credit: wikipedia.org

River Havel at Lake Wannsee – Photo Credit: wikipedia.org

Given to cynicism, he withdrew from the harsh reality of life under the Communist regime and moved with his wife into a little cottage with a flower garden back into the village Strodehne near Rhinow. There he lived for another year, during which time he indulged in his angling passion at the River Havel. On July 17, 1952 his wife found him dead lying in her flower beds. At the age of 73 he had suffered a fatal heart attack.

Descendants:

  1.  Margarethe
  2. Charlotte
  3. Gertrud
  4. Victoria Luise
  5. Meta
  6. Rosel

 

9 comments

  1. arv! · March 10, 2016

    Who owns the building now Peter?

    Like

  2. krysiakorsak · March 10, 2016

    …I can fully understand Ferdinand’s desire to withdraw and retire to the stillness and solitude of Rhinow. Those were such turbulent and painful times my friend as my family also experienced the Soviets doing the same on Poland’s eastern border. I commend that lady, Rosalie for keeping her daughters safe and she had the Polish language. Synchronicity…I am about to post some words about my Mother and her experiences during the war with a little Polish thrown in for good measure. It all links up together!

    Ferdinand died and fell into his flower bed…I do so hope there was a wonderful scent of flowers in the air as his soul departed this life! Another really interesting read Peter. 💐🎑

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · March 10, 2016

      Thank you for your understanding words! I am looking forward to your post on your mother. I was able to speak a little bit as a 3 year old. But I had no opportunity to practice since. Greetings from rainy Fauquier!

      Liked by 1 person

      • krysiakorsak · March 10, 2016

        …and greetings from a very sunny Scotland earlier today. Getting late here now but we have another sunny day in store tomorrow. Everything is waking up in this sunshine…including Homo Sapiens! Hope your weather becomes a little brighter for you too, soon…😊

        Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · March 10, 2016

      I meant of course a little bit of Polish. Sorry!

      Liked by 1 person

      • krysiakorsak · March 10, 2016

        …chuckle, yes! You could talk very well by the time you were 3 and a little Polish as well… that was extremely clever and useful I should think. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

  3. BunKaryudo · March 10, 2016

    Those years must have been very tough for him. I’m glad he was at least able to find a quiet, peaceful place where he could indulge his hobby.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Peter Klopp · March 10, 2016

      Yes, I agree. Also his sudden death is preferable to suffering for weeks and months on a painful incurable disease.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. taphian · March 10, 2016

    I’m always interested in other peoples’ lifes and your stories are always well written, Peter. Have a nice day, regards from Hamburg, Mitza

    Liked by 1 person

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